Folsom California Real Estate and Community Information

Folsom California Real Estate and Community Information

All About Folsom California

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Folsom is a city in Sacramento County, California, United States. It is commonly known for Folsom Prison, the song “Folsom Prison Blues” and Folsom Lake. The population was 72,203 at the 2010 census.

Folsom is part of the SacramentoArden-ArcadeRoseville Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History

Folsom is named for Joseph Libbey Folsom who purchased Rancho Rio de los Americanos from the heirs of San Francisco merchant William Alexander Leidesdorff, and laid out the town called Granite City, mostly occupied by gold miners seeking their fortune in the Sierra Nevada foothills. Though few amassed a great deal of wealth, the city prospered due to Joseph Folsom’s lobbying to get a railway to connect the town with Sacramento. Joseph died in 1855, and Granite City was later renamed Folsom in his honor. The railway was abandoned in the 1980 but opened up as the terminus of the Gold Line of Sacramento Regional Transit District‘s light rail service in 2005. A few former gold-rush era towns are located within the city limits of Folsom, including Prairie CitySalmon Falls, and Mormon Island (though these towns no longer exist).

Folsom hosted a significant Chinese American community when it was first incorporated, but arsonists burned Folsom’s Chinatown in March 1886, driving Chinese Americans out of town.

The establishment of Folsom Prison came in 1880, when the Livermore family made an agreement with the state to donate land for the prison in exchange for prison labor. They planned to build a hydro-electric dam from the American River for a sawmill. Though the sawmill did not work out, the Livermores soon realized that the natural force of running water could provide enough power to transmit to Sacramento, and the Folsom Powerhouse, now a National Historic Landmark, was opened. At the time it was opened, it had the longest overhead run of electricity (22 miles) in the country. The powerhouse operated until 1952.

Folsom Dam was built in 1956, providing much-needed flood control and water rights for the Sacramento Valley. The creation of this dam also created one of the most popular lakes in Northern CaliforniaFolsom Lake. The dam is located on the southwest corner of the lake. The lake is an estimated 4.8 miles (7.7 km) from Granite Bay to the most southern point of Folsom Lake.

Folsom is home to Folsom Lake CollegeFolsom DamFolsom LakeFolsom High SchoolVista del Lago High School and a historic district. Folsom is also home to the largest private employer in the Sacramento area, Intel.

Revitalization

In 1988, the city embarked on a multi-million dollar plan to redevelop approximately 207 acres (0.8 km2) of land in the downtown core, and revitalize historic areas that had been in decline. Projects included the Vernon Streetscape Project, Atlantic Street Beautification, Civic Plaza Complex, Downtown Vernon Street and Historic Old Town, Historic Old Town Streetscape project, Riverside Avenue Streetscape project, Oak Street Improvement Project, and Washington Boulevard pedestrian underpass.  A new parking garage opened in 2007, the Roseville Arts! Blueline Gallery opened in 2008, a new Civic Center opened in 2013, and the Vernon Street Town Square now features a small raised stage, a water spray for children, and a venue for community events.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 34 square miles (88 km2), of which, 31.9 square miles (83 km2) of it is land and 2.4 square miles (6.2 km2) of it (9.69%) is water, primarily accounted for by Folsom Lake. Folsom is located in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada.

Folsom’s climate is characterized by long, hot, dry summers and cool, rainy winters.

Climate data for Folsom, California (Folsom Dam), 1981–2010 normals
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 54
(12)
61
(16)
65
(18)
72
(22)
81
(27)
89
(32)
94
(34)
94
(34)
88
(31)
79
(26)
62
(17)
54
(12)
74
(23)
Average low °F (°C) 38
(3)
43
(6)
46
(8)
48
(9)
52
(11)
58
(14)
61
(16)
60
(16)
58
(14)
54
(12)
44
(7)
39
(4)
50
(10)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 3.70
(94)
4.63
(118)
4.65
(118)
1.74
(44)
.67
(17)
.38
(9.7)
.06
(1.5)
.11
(2.8)
.62
(16)
1.46
(37)
3.96
(101)
3.83
(97)
25.80
(655)
Source: 

2010

The 2010 United States Census reported that Folsom had a population of 72,203. The population density was 2,971.2 people per square mile (1,147.2/km²). The racial makeup of Folsom was 53,627 (74.3%) White, 4,140 (5.7%) African American, 427 (0.6%) Native American, 9,000 (12.5%) Asian, 173 (0.2%) Pacific Islander, 1,818 (2.5%) from other races, and 3,018 (4.2%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8,064 persons (11.2%).

The Census reported that 65,243 people (90.4% of the population) lived in households, 188 (0.3%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 6,772 (9.4%) were institutionalized.

There were 24,951 households, out of which 9,796 (39.3%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 14,399 (57.7%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 2,195 (8.8%) had a female householder with no husband present, 1,006 (4.0%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 1,150 (4.6%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 137 (0.5%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 5,788 households (23.2%) were made up of individuals and 1,930 (7.7%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.61. There were 17,600 families (70.5% of all households); the average family size was 3.13.

The population was spread out with 17,570 people (24.3%) under the age of 18, 5,344 people (7.4%) aged 18 to 24, 23,022 people (31.9%) aged 25 to 44, 19,358 people (26.8%) aged 45 to 64, and 6,909 people (9.6%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37.6 years. For every 100 females, there were 114.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 117.9 males.

There were 26,109 housing units at an average density of 1,074.4 per square mile (414.8/km²), of which 17,442 (69.9%) were owner-occupied, and 7,509 (30.1%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 1.9%; the rental vacancy rate was 5.2%. 47,982 people (66.5% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 17,261 people (23.9%) lived in rental housing units.

2000

As of the census of 2000, there were 51,884 people, 17,196 households, and 12,518 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,386.7 people per square mile (921.5/km²). There were 17,968 housing units at an average density of 826.5 per square mile (319.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 77.89% Caucasian, 5.99% African American, 0.58% Native American, 7.19% Asian, 0.19% Pacific Islander, 4.71% from other races, and 3.43% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 9.47% of the population.

There were 17,196 households out of which 39.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.7% were married couples living together, 8.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.2% were non-families. 21.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 3.08.

In the city, the population was spread out with 24.2% under the age of 18, 6.6% from 18 to 24, 39.0% from 25 to 44, 21.4% from 45 to 64, and 8.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 123.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 131.0 males.

According to a 2007 estimate, the median income for a household in the city was $87,542, and the median income for a family was $109,032. Males had a median income of $60,616 versus $42,434 for females. The per capita income for the city was $30,210. About 2.6% of families and 7.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.1% of those under age 18 and 4.3% of those age 65 or over.

Government and infrastructure

The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation prisons Folsom State Prison and California State Prison, Sacramento are located in Folsom.

The United States Postal Service operates the Folsom Post Office.

The Sacramento Regional Transit District extended the light rail train system to Folsom via an extension to the Gold Line in October 2005, providing direct service to Downtown Sacramento.

Economy

Top employers

According to the City’s 2016 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, the top employers in the city are: Total City Labor Force : 35,600

# Employer Employees Percentage of Total CityEmployment
1 Intel Corporation 5,927 16.65%
2 California State Prison 1,785 5.01%
3 Folsom Prison 1,075 3.02%
4 Folsom Cordova Unified School District 874 2.46%
5 Mercy Hospital of Folsom 770 2.16%
6 California ISO 577 1.62%
7 City of Folsom 410 1.15%
8 Micron Technology Inc 400 1.12%
9 Walmart 304 0.85%
10 Costco 300 0.84%

Education

The Georgia Murray Building

Folsom Lake College is a public community college which is part of the Los Rios Community College District.

Folsom Cordova Unified School District operates public schools. Folsom High School and Vista del Lago High School are located in Folsom. There are two middle schools in Folsom: Folsom Middle School and Sutter Middle School.

The city operates the Folsom Public Library, located in the Georgia Murray Building.

Public safety

Folsom is protected by the Folsom Police Department and the Folsom Fire Department. The police department is a full service agency with Operations, Administration, and Investigations Division. The Patrol Bureau of the Operations Division consists of patrol, traffic, canines, bicycles, SWAT and school resource officers. The Investigations Bureau investigates persons, property, juvenile services and narcotics.

Chief Cynthia Renaud was appointed in 2011 to oversee the 73 officers and 26 professional staff employed by the police department. The police are augmented by a reserve officer program, an explorer scout program, and an award-winning volunteer program named Citizen’s Assisting Public Safety (CAPS).

Folsom experiences a very low crime rate, a majority of which are property crimes. The FBI’s Uniformed Crime Report consistently shows Folsom as one of the lowest crime rates in the State of California. Both the Folsom Police Department and Folsom Fire Department utilize Nixle.com, Facebook, and Twitter to keep residents and business owners informed of emergencies and crime trends.

Sacramento is home to one major league sports team — the Sacramento Kings of the National Basketball Association. The Kings came to Sacramento from Kansas City in 1985. On January 21, 2013, a controlling interest of the Sacramento Kings was sold to Chris Hansen, who intended to move the franchise to Seattle for the 2013–2014 NBA season and rename the team the Seattle SuperSonics. Sacramento Mayor Kevin Johnson fought the move, forming an ownership group led by Vivek Ranadive to keep the Kings in Sacramento. On May 16, 2013, the NBA Board of Governors voted 22–8 to keep the Kings in Sacramento.

Sacramento has two other professional teams. Sacramento Republic FC began play in April 2014 at Hughes Stadium before a sellout crowd of 20,231, setting a USL Pro regular-season single game attendance record. They now play in Papa Murphy’s Park. The Republic FC won the USL championship in their first season. In 2000, AAA minor league baseball returned to Sacramento with the Sacramento River Cats, an affiliate of the San Francisco Giants and formerly an affiliate of the Oakland Athletics. The River Cats play in Raley Field, in West Sacramento.

Sacramento is the former home of two professional basketball teams. The Sacramento Heatwave of the American Basketball Association previously played in the Sacramento area until 2013. Sacramento was also formerly home to the now defunct Sacramento Monarchs of the WNBA. The Monarchs were one of the eight founding members of the WNBA in 1997 and won the WNBA Championship in 2005, but folded in November 2009.

Sacramento professional teams (ranked by attendance)
Club League Sport Venue Attendance Established Championships
Sacramento Kings NBA Basketball Golden 1 Center 16,291 1923 (1985) 1 NBA, 2 NBL (as Rochester Royals)
Sacramento Republic FC USLC (D2) Soccer Papa Murphy’s Park 13,763 2012 1 USL Pro
Sacramento River Cats PCL (AAA) Baseball Raley Field 8,435 1978 (2000) 2 Triple-A titles, 4 League titles

Sacramento has frequently hosted the NCAA Men’s Outdoor Track and Field Championship as well as the 1st and 2nd rounds of the NCAA Men’s Division I Basketball Championship. The California International Marathon (est. 1983) attracts a field of international elite runners who vie for a share of the $50,000 prize purse. The fast course is popular for runners seeking to achieve a Boston Marathon qualifying time and fitness runners.

Performing arts

There are several major theatre venues for Sacramento. The Sacramento Convention Center Complex governs both the Community Center Theatre and Memorial Auditorium. The Wells Fargo Pavilion is the most recent addition in 2003. It is built atop the old Music Circus tent foundations. Next to that is the McClatchy Main stage, originally built as a television studio, which was renovated at the same time the pavilion was built. It is the smaller of the venues and provides seating for only 300. The Sacramento BalletSacramento Philharmonic Orchestra and the Sacramento Opera perform at the Community Center Theater.

Professional theatre is represented in Sacramento by a number of companies. Broadway Sacramento and its Summer stock theatreBroadway At Music Circus, lure many directors, performers, and artists from New York and Los Angeles to work alongside a large local staff for their productions at the Wells Fargo Pavilion. During the fall, winter and spring seasons Broadway Sacramento brings bus and truck tours to the Community Center Theater. At the B Street Theatre, smaller and more intimate professional productions are performed as well as a children’s theatre. In February 2018, the theatre moved from its original location and opened a larger theatre complex in the heart of Midtown. Rounding out the professional companies is Capital Stage, which performed aboard the Delta King until the end of the 2010–2011 season and soon took up residence at its own venue along the J-Street corridor.

The Sacramento area has one of the largest collection of community theatres in California. Some of these include the Thistle Dew Dessert Theatre and Playwrights Workshop, Davis Musical Theatre Co., El Dorado Musical Theatre, Runaway Stage Productions, River City Theatre Company, Flying Monkey Productions, The Actor’s Theatre, KOLT Run Productions, Kookaburra Productions, Big Idea Theatre, Celebration Arts, Lambda Player, Light Opera Theatre of Sacramento, Synergy Stage and the historic Eagle Theatre. The Sacramento Shakespeare Festival provides entertainment under the stars every summer in William Land Park. Many of these theatres compete annually for the Elly Awards overseen by The Sacramento Area Regional Theatre Alliance or SARTA.

Visual arts

The Sacramento Metropolitan Arts Commission is an organization which was established as the Sacramento arts council in 1977 to provide several arts programs for the city. These include Art in Public Places, Arts Education, Grants and Cultural Programs, Poet Laureate Program, Arts Stabilization Programs and Other Resources and opportunities.

Sacramento Second Saturday Art Walk is a program of local art galleries that stay open into the late evenings every second Saturday of each month, providing a unique experience for the local population as well as tourists to view original art and meet the artists themselves.

Museums

The Crocker Art Museum is the oldest public art museum in the Western United States and has one of the premier public art collections in the country.

Sacramento has several major museums. The Crocker Art Museum is the oldest public art museum west of the Mississippi River. On July 26, 2007, the museum broke ground for an expansion that more than tripled the museum’s floor space. The modern architecture is very different from the museum’s original Victorian style building. Construction was completed in 2010.

Also of interest is the Governor’s Mansion State Historic Park, a large Victorian Mansion which was home to 13 of California’s Governors, as well as the official residence for current governor Jerry Brown following renovations in 2015. The Leland Stanford Mansion State Historic Park, which was completely restored in 2006, serves as the State’s official address for diplomatic and business receptions. Guided public tours are available. The California Museum for History, Women, and the Arts, home of the California Hall of Fame, is a cultural destination dedicated to telling the rich history of California and its unique influence on the world of ideas, innovation, art and culture. The museum educates tens of thousands of school children through inspiring programs, sharing with world visitors California’s rich art, history and cultural legacy through dynamic exhibits, and serving as a public forum and international meeting place.

The California State Railroad Museum in Old Sacramento has historical exhibits and live steam locomotives that patrons may ride. The California Automobile Museum, located just south of Old Sacramento, is filled with automotive history and vehicles from 1880 to 2006 and is the oldest non-profit automotive museum in the West. The mission of it is to preserve, promote, and teach automotive culture and its influence on our lives—past, present and future. In addition, the Sacramento History Museum, in the heart of Old Sacramento, focuses on the history of Sacramento from the region’s pre-Gold Rush history through the present day.

There is a Museum Day held in Sacramento every year, when 26 museums in the greater Sacramento area offer free admission. The 2009 Sacramento Museum Day brought out more than 80,000 people, the largest number the event has gathered. Sacramento Museum Day is held every year on the first Saturday of February.

Music

Tower Records was started and based in Sacramento until its closing Rappers C-BoMarvalessLunasicc, and more recently rappers like Mozzy and Chuuwee are among those native to the area. Classical music is widely available. The Sacramento Philharmonic Orchestra, the Sacramento Baroque Soloists, the Sacramento Choral Society & Orchestra, the Sacramento Youth Symphony, the Sacramento Master Singers, the Sacramento Children’s Chorus, and the Camellia Symphony each present a full season of concerts.

Each year, the city hosts the Sammies, the Sacramento Music Awards. Sacramento also has a reputation as a center for Dixieland jazz, because of the Sacramento Jazz Jubilee which is held every Memorial Day weekend. Events and performances are held in multiple locations throughout the city. Each year thousands of jazz fans from all over the world visit for this one weekend.

A growing number of rock, hardcore and metal bands hail from the Sacramento area, including TeslaDeftonesPapa RoachWill HavenTrash Talk, Dance Gavin DanceA Lot Like BirdsFarCAKE!!!Oleander and Steel Breeze; plus some other famous musicians like record producer and recording artist Charlie PeacockBob Stubbs of Social Distortion and Craig Chaquico of Jefferson Starship. Along with these bands, the Aftershock Festival has been held at Discovery Park since 2012.

Scottish pop band Middle of the Road sang kindly of Sacramento in their 1972 European hit song “Sacramento”. Experimental groups such as HellaDeath Grips, and Tera Melos also come out of Sacramento.

Film

Sacramento is home to the Sacramento French Film Festival, a cultural event held every year in July that features U.S. premieres of French films and classic masterpieces of French cinema and the Sacramento Japanese Film Festival, also held in July. In addition, Sacramento is home to the Trash Film Orgy, a summer film festival celebrating the absurd, B-movies, horror, monster, exploitation. Founded in 2007, the Sacramento Horror Film Festival showcases feature-length and short films as well as live musical and theatrical performances in the horror and macabre genres.

Of note, Sacramento has been home to various actors, including Eddie Murphy, who resided in the Riverlake community of Pocket-Greenhaven with his then wife Nicole Mitchell Murphy, a fashion model and Sacramento native. It is also the home of director Greta Gerwig, whose solo directorial debut Lady Bird is set in Sacramento.

Cuisine

The Sacramento Theatre Companyis Sacramento’s oldest theatre troupe

In 2012, Sacramento started the marketing campaign as “America’s Farm-to-Fork Capital” due to Sacramento’s many restaurants that source their food locally from the numerous surrounding farms. The city has an annual Farm-to-Fork festival that showcases various grocers and growers in the industry. In 2012, The Kitchen was nominated for Outstanding Restaurant by the James Beard Foundation. It continues to excel, earning the AAA‘s Five Diamond dining award since 2011. Sacramento is home to well-known cookbook authors, Biba Caggiano of Biba’s Restaurant and Mai Pham of Lemongrass and Star Ginger.

Sacramento is also known for its beverage culture, with keystone events that include Cal Expo‘s Grape and Gourmet, Sacramento Beer Week, and Sacramento Cocktail Week. Its growing beer scene is evident, with over 60 microbreweries in the region as of 2017. Some local brews include Track 7 Brewing Company, Big Stump Brew Co, Oak Park Brewing Co., and Sactown Union Brewery. Numerous beer festivals around the region highlight both local and visitor beers. In addition to festivals in Elk Grove, Davis, Roseville, Placerville, and Woodland, Sacramento hosts the annual California Beer Craft Summit, an exposition dedicated to the art of brewing. The summit also hosts the largest beer festival on the West Coast, featuring over 160 breweries in downtown Sacramento.

Sacramento’s contemporary culture is reflected in its coffee. An “underrated coffee city”, Sacramento has above-average marks for local coffee. The city has numerous community roasters and coffee shops. Examples include Temple Coffee, Insight Coffee Roasters, Old Soul Co., Chocolate Fish Roasters, Naked Lounge, Pachamama Roasting Co., and Identity Coffees. In addition to local brands, the region offers other chains like Starbucks, Peet’s Coffee & Tea, and Philz Coffee.

LGBTQ

Sacramento has one of the highest LGBT populations per capita, ranking seventh among major American cities, and third in California behind San Francisco and slightly behind Oakland, with roughly 10% of the city’s total population identifying themselves as gay, lesbian, transgender, or bisexual. Lavender Heights is the hub for LGBTQ activities in the city and is a centrally located district in Midtown Sacramento centered within and around K & 20th streets. The area owes its name to the high number of gay-owned homes and businesses residing there. The area is also home to many of the city’s LGBTQ inclusive music and arts festivals, including the Second Saturday Block Party from May to September.

Old Sacramento

The oldest part of the town besides Sutter’s Fort is Old Sacramento, which consists of cobbled streets and many historic buildings, several from the 1850s and 1860s. Buildings have been preserved, restored or reconstructed, and the district is now a substantial tourist attraction, with rides on steam-hauled historic trains and horse-drawn carriages.

The historic buildings include the Lady Adams Building, built by the passengers and ship’s carpenters of the ship Lady Adams. Having survived the Great Conflagration of November 1852, it is the oldest surviving building in Sacramento other than Sutter’s Fort.

Another surviving landmark is the B.F. Hastings building, built in 1853. Early home of the California Supreme Court and the location of the office of Theodore Judah, it also was the western terminus of the Pony Express.

The “Big Four Building”, built in 1852, was home to the offices of Collis HuntingtonMark HopkinsLeland Stanford, and Charles Crocker. The Central Pacific Railroad and Southern Pacific Railroad were founded there. The original building was destroyed in 1963 for the construction of Interstate 5, but was re-created using original elements in 1965. It is now a National Historic Landmark. Also of historic interest is the Eagle Theatre (Sacramento, California), a reconstruction of California’s first permanent theatre in its original location.

Chinatown

Historic Sacramento Chinatown Paifang.

The Opium Wars of the 1840s and 1850s, along with the Gold Rush, brought many Chinese to California. Most arrived at San Francisco, which was then the largest city in California and known as “Dai Fow” (“Big City”, Chinese: 大埠, Jyutpingdaai6 fau6). Some eventually came to Sacramento, then the second-largest city in California and consequently called “Yee Fow” (“Second City”, Chinese: 二埠, Jyutping: ji6 fau6). Today the city is known as 萨克拉门托 (pinyinSàkèlāméntuō) by Mainland Chinese and as 沙加緬度 (pinyin: Shājiāmiǎnduó) by Taiwanese.

Sacramento’s Chinatown was located on “I” Street from Second to Sixth Streets. At the time, this area of “I” Street was considered a health hazard because, lying within a levee zone, it was lower than other parts of the city, which were situated on higher land. Throughout Sacramento’s Chinatown history, there were fires, acts of discrimination, and prejudicial legislation such as the Chinese Exclusion Act that was not repealed until 1943. The mysterious fires were thought to be set off by those who did not take a liking to the Chinese working class. Ordinances on what was viable building material were set into place to try to get the Chinese to move out. Newspapers such as The Sacramento Union wrote stories at the time that portrayed the Chinese in an unfavorable light to inspire ethnic discrimination and drive the Chinese away. As the years passed, a railroad was created over parts of the Chinatown, and further policies and laws would make it even harder for Chinese workers to sustain a living in Sacramento.

While most of Sacramento’s Chinatown has now been razed, a small Chinatown mall remains as well as a museum dedicated to the history of Sacramento’s Chinatown and the contributions Chinese Americans have made to the city. Amtrak sits along what was part of Sacramento’s Chinatown “I” Street.

Bike Trails

Folsom is home to 32 miles of bike trails including the Humbug-Willow Creek Trail. This particular trail system follows both Humbug and Willow Creeks, and passes through several traces of dredge tailings and riparian forests. Other trails include the Folsom Rail Trail (along Folsom Boulevard), The Folsom Lake Trail (to connect El Dorado Hills with Lake Natoma), and the Oak Parkway Trail (between Blue Ravine Road and East Natoma Street).

Folsom is also the endpoint of the American River Bike Trail, which starts in Sacramento.

Folsom Lake Recreational Area has a wide range of off-road biking and hiking trails. A few of the more popular trails include the American River Trail, Pioneer Express Trail, Sweetwater Trail, and Rattlesnake Bar-Horseshoe Bar Trail. These trails are more strenuous and range from 2 miles to 10 mile hiking trails, and offer amazing views of Folsom Lake, surrounding trees and vegetation, as well as wildlife.

Magazines

Newspapers

Top two newspapers
  • The Sacramento Bee, the primary newspaper, was founded in 1857 by James McClatchyThe Sacramento Bee is the flagship paper of The McClatchy Company, the second-largest newspaper publisher in the United States. The Sacramento Bee has won five Pulitzer Prizes in its history and numerous other awards, including many for its progressive public service campaigns promoting free speech (the Bee often criticized government policy, and uncovered many scandals hurting Californians), anti-racism (the Bee supported the Union during the American Civil War and later publicly denounced the Ku Klux Klan), worker’s rights (the Bee has a strong history of supporting unionization), and environmental protection (leading numerous tree-planting campaigns and fighting against environmental destruction in the Sierra Nevada).
  • The Sacramento Union, the Sacramento Bees rival, started publishing six years earlier in 1851; it closed its doors in 1994, with a revival attempt lasting from 2005 to 2009. Writer and journalist Mark Twain wrote for the Union in 1866.
Other newspapers

Radio

Television stations

Channel Call Sign Network Subchannels
3 KCRA-TV NBC MeTV on 3.2
6 KVIE PBS PBS Encore on 6.2, World on 6.3, PBS Kids on 6.4
8 KBTV-CD Independent Ethnic Infomercials on 8.2, SBN on 8.3, Independent on 8.4, Retro Television Network on 8.5, HOT TV on 8.6, Rev’n on 8.7
10 KXTV ABC Justice Network on 10.2, Heroes & Icons on 10.3
13 KOVR CBS Decades on 13.2
19 KUVS-DT Univision Bounce TV on 19.3, Escape on 19.4
27 K20JX-D 3ABN
29 KSPX-TV Ion Qubo on 29.2, Ion Life on 29.3, Ion Shop on 29.4, QVC on 29.5, HSN on 29.6
31 KMAX-TV CW
32 KSTV-LP Azteca
33 KCSO-LD Telemundo
40 KTXL Fox Antenna TV on 40.2, This TV on 40.3
58 KQCA MyNetworkTV Movies! on 58.2
64 KTFK Telefutura

Bridges[edit]

Bridges located in Folsom include the Lake Natoma Crossing; the Rainbow Bridge, a historic truss bridge; and Folsom Lake Crossing. There is also a pedestrian bridge over East Bidwell Street that opened on November 6, 2010 as part of a new segment on the Humbug-Willow Creek Trail called the Johnny Cash Trail and a Johnny Cash Bridge crossing over near the intersection of Folsom Lake Crossing and East Natoma that was unveiled on October 4, 2014.

Looking east from Lake Natoma Crossing Bridge. Historic Folsom is on the right.

Notable people

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