Rancho Cordova California Real Estate and Community Information

Rancho Cordova California Real Estate and Community Information

All About Rancho Cordova California

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Rancho Cordova is a city in Sacramento CountyCaliforniaUnited States which incorporated in 2003. It is part of the Sacramento Metropolitan Area. The population was 64,776 at the 2010 census. Rancho Cordova is the Sacramento area’s largest employment sub-center, attracting over 50,000 commuters. The city is served by Sacramento Regional Transit‘s various bus lines and the Gold Line light rail line, though fewer than 0.1 percent of commuters to Rancho Cordova use the line according to the US Census Bureau’s American Community Survey (2010-2012). In 2010 Rancho Cordova was named as a winner of the All-America City Award.

History

Originally called Mayhew’s Crossing and Hangtown Crossing (c. 1855) during the Gold Rush era, the area was renamed Mayhew Station and Mills Station (c. 1900), respectively. The city itself was named for the Cordova Vineyard, which was located in the center of the Rancho Rio de los Americanos land grant. Other names of the town included Cordova Vineyards and Cordova Village, before it was officially named Rancho Cordova when a post office was established in the community in 1955.

In the Gold Rush era of mid 19th century California, certain Placer mining activities took place in the Rancho Cordova environs, some traces of which disturbance are extant. The elevation of the generally level terrain is approximately 118 feet (36 m) above mean sea level. Lone Star Gravel Company and other companies have historically extracted younger gravels at depths of 30 to 40 feet (12 m) without encountering groundwater, which is characteristically found at about 100 feet (30 m). Partially confined groundwater generally flows to the southwest.

For many years, Rancho Cordova was the community called ‘Mills’, located in the eastern part of the Brighton Township. It was called Mills as early as 1893, supposedly because of the old grist mills that were close by along the river. At the top of Bradshaw, along the American River, close to the oak tree that marked the northwest boundary of the Spanish Land Grant, Rancho Rio De Los Americanos, there are still some remains of foundations. You can locate them by looking for the Grist Mill Dam Recreation Area along the American River Parkway. The southwestern boundary of the grant was 300 feet west of Bradshaw not far north of Florin Road. The boundary then went due east over to Grantline Road, and northeast along the roadway.

The 35,500 acre Rancho Rio De Los Americanos was granted to William Leidesdorff in 1844 but he died in 1848, leaving the Rancho and some properties in San Francisco to his heirs. Capt. Joseph Folsom purchased the Rancho from the heirs and founded a town in 1855 which he named after himself – Folsom. The old Liedesdorff adobe was constructed in 1846 in the vicinity of Routier Station.

As the miners left Sacramento traveling to the foothills in search of gold, way stations grew up along the first dirt trails, and later more formal roads, that took travelers east. Commercial establishments, hotels, or ‘stations’ were developed at one-mile intervals along the route. Many of the stations ultimately also became the US Post Office for their area, and many of these early settlers served as postmaster or postmistress.

Travelers and miners apparently headed out L Street from Sacramento, the approximate alignment of present-day Folsom Blvd., along a plank, or macadam, road that ended at present day Bradshaw Road. Brighton, also called Five Mile Station, was the site of three inns. One inn, the Magnolia House, established in 1849, was the first stop on the Pony Express Route. The location is today marked by the old Brighton Station building, visible on the south side of Folsom Boulevard where the overpasses for Highway 50 and the light rail are located. One closer stop, at four miles, was known as Hoboken or Norristown, in the vicinity of CSUS. The old Perkins building, where the Jackson Highway leaves Folsom Boulevard, and Manlove were both locations for way stations.

The vicinity of Bradshaw was Ten Mile Station, the Patterson’s “American Fork House”, established in 1852, and the beginning of large farms, vineyards, and orchards. Up the road was Routier Station, established in 1871. Mrs. Mayhew left Mayhew Station to take over as PostMistress at Routier Station when the post office opened in 1887. Mr. Patterson was Postmaster there for a while also. Joseph Routier was widely renowned for many years for the quality of his produce. In 1866 the railroad built the train station between Folsom Boulevard and the tracks due to the size and dependability of the crop, and the need for a formal packing shed to house the produce waiting for the train. (The station still exists as Pfingst Realty Mr. Pfingst died in 2007; the structure is owned by his daughter.)

At eleven miles, the road forked. The Coloma Road went north along the river to Coloma and the northern mines, very close to its present location; the southerly fork headed for White Rock and the southern mines. The area was first known as Hangtown Crossing, referencing the route to Old Hangtown – or Placerville. The southerly fork was the White Rock Road, known at that time as the White Rock – Clarksville Immigrant Road. The outcropping of white rock marked the entry into El Dorado County, and Clarksville was the first sizable settlement over the hill. 15 Mile House was built in 1850, and is commemorated with a brick cairn on White Rock Road in front of the CalTrans Emergency Ops building. It was managed by A.M. Plummer until purchased in 1857 by its most famous innkeeper, H.F.W. Deterding. His son Charles ran the hotel until at least 1890, and their hospitality was known far and wide. 15 Mile House was the second official Pony Express remount station. Eleven miles east of that, the third remount station was located at Sportsman Hall at Mormon Island, before the express riders went over the mountains headed for St. Joseph, Missouri. The Mormon Island ruins surface from under Folsom Lake at Dike 8 during low water years.

There were also way stations along the Coloma Road, such as the 14 Mile House, built on the Coloma Road in 1850 by Mr. Rush, the original builder of Deterding’s 15 Mile House. In 1852 early settlement of the Mills area included a two story inn owned by Louis Lepetit. Four stage lines came through there, and split, with two going southeast to Placerville, and two following the river to Coloma. In the 1880s a fire destroyed the inn, and Mr. Lepetit may have rebuilt across the road on the north side.

A strong community of vineyards and orchards had grown up between the 1850s and the 1880s. Maps of the area show the familiar names of Studarus, Williamson, Mendonca, Kelley, Carroll, Shields, Dauenhauer, Lauridson, Kilgore, and Deterding. The list goes on with names that to a small extent, have been preserved as place names. John Studarus was one of the early settlers. He had thirteen children. The presumed eldest, Charles, operated the family farms; John Jr., the second or third eldest, purchased five acres of land at Hangtown Crossing, near Lepetit’s site, and built a hotel. In 1911, he built the present day Mills Station. It was a general commercial building, housing a tavern and grocery store. The second floor was a large ballroom, where he celebrated the opening of the building by issuing an open invitation to everyone around to attend a grand ball. The building also housed the Post Office, and two of his children, William Henry and Helen, both ran the Post Office at various times.

William Henry Studarus died perhaps in the late 1970s, and Helen Studarus McCray, whom everyone remembers as the Post Mistress, died in 1982 or 1983. William Henry also helped his father run the store, selling groceries, hardware, and gasoline. At sometime prior to the war, the County established a branch of the free library, which local residents also remember coming to.

In 1949 Mills Station was bought by Mr. and Mrs. Lerch, parents of later Fire Chief Bob Lerch and famous baseball player Randy Lerch. Their daughter, Mrs. Doris Lauridson, held her wedding reception in the ballroom on the second floor in 1950. The general store, library, and gas station continued to serve the community. Mills Fire Department has been photographed several times with its fire trucks and firemen on parade out front. Gasoline was sold there (the pumps are visible in the 1952 photo). The building that previously sat across the street, housing the Sharp Shop, was a fire house, along with another small building on the east side of Routiers Road between Folsom Blvd. and Horn Road. The Sharp Shop, a lawn mower repair business, was finally demolished in about 2002. At that time it had deteriorated and the original walls had been replaced with corrugated metal panels, leaving virtually nothing of the original structure.

Tom Raley bought Mills Station in 1956. The Raley’s organization believes he ran the grocery store, but community residents do not remember it being called Raley’s. In 1972 after negotiations between the Fire District, Sacramento County, Raley’s, and the Sons and Daughters of the Golden West, the building was moved to back north of the Boulevard about 200 feet. It was renovated as a restaurant but was never quite successful, and changed hands many times over 20 years. The last tenant moved out in August 1991 and the building sat idle, used only by vagrants and transients. It was secured, preserved, and moved once again. In its final life, Mills Station has been restored as a community center at the Mather Field / Mills Light Rail Station approximately 1000 feet from its original location. The agricultural heritage of Rancho Cordova fell onto hard times in the 1930s and 1940s. Along with Joseph Routier’s nationally recognized produce, wine from Roland Federspiel’s Cordova Vineyards had been served at White House table during the Teddy Roosevelt presidency. Unfortunately, northern California went through a lengthy period of drought. Making things worse, the State Legislature raised property tax rates, setting values at “the highest and best use” as opposed to the actual use of the land. It became more and more difficult for farmers to keep their land in production.

At this point, all of the young men returning from World War II were looking for places to settle down, find a job, buy a home, and raise their families. Roland Federspiel formed a partnership with Glenn Ahlstrom and a contractor named Jacobsen to build homes on land that had previously been vineyards. Up until that point after the War, there had not been any production housing in the United States. Homes had been constructed individually or in small numbers.

Construction began at the intersection of Folsom Boulevard and Zinfandel Drive. The first three homes on the west side of the street were the model homes. Duplexes on the opposite corners originally housed the sales office and post office, then the first office of The Grapevine newspaper. There was a playground for children whose parents were touring the model homes, and Art Linkletter came to cut the ribbon at the Grand Opening!

Federspiel had chosen the name Cordova Vineyards with a nod to the Cordoba Region in Spain, and wanted to preserve the Cordova name. Glenn Ahlstrom drove down to San Francisco in his old woodie station wagon and physically brought back the first ‘post box’. The US Postal Service agreed to let them use the name Rancho Cordova as it was just the right size to fit around the circle of the old postal franking stamp. They named the streets for wine grapes. It is a treat to find some of those old grapes coming back into production again, with wines like Malbec and Barbera. In recognition of that heritage, Elliott Homes named all of the streets in the Villages of Zinfandel at Stonecreek for wineries around the world when they began to build at the south end of Zinfandel in 2000.

The community grew, and Folsom Boulevard began to fill in with commercial enterprise. Early structures included the Cordova Village Shopping Center and George E. Johnson’s Cordova Inn. (George E. Johnson is the father of restaurateur Eppie Johnson. The ‘E’ stands for Eppaminondous, and Eppie used it to name a more formal restaurant on Zinfandel around 1980. The building is still in operation as a restaurant today, but is on the fourth restaurant chain since then.)

Most of the residents of the 1950s and 1960s came to work at either Aerojet, during the height of the space race, or were stationed at Mather Air Force Base. There were only a little over 1000 homes in the Mather housing area, so most people lived off base. Along with other people who found the new Rancho Cordova a desirable place to live were the many people who came to open businesses and establish all of the organizations that any true community needs in order to thrive and prosper. Early residents opened gas stations, insurance agencies, the Hallmark Store, Baskin Robbins Ice Cream, the veterinary office, medical offices, a travel agency, churches, and the florist shop. These community builders were also the principals at the junior and senior high schools, the manager at the Chamber of Commerce, the general manager at the Park District, the chief at the Fire District, pastors and priests. They founded local branches of Rotary, Kiwanis, Optimist Club, JCs, the Moose, and the Elks.

They invented a new organization called the Cordova Community Council as a means for all of these civic institutions to come together to share information and work on community projects. One of the first efforts literally resulted in putting Rancho Cordova on the map! It bothered everyone that Rancho Cordova did not appear on the Rand McNally’s, and they wrote letters persistently until the mapping company gave up and put Rancho Cordova on the map.

There were attempts to incorporate Rancho Cordova in 1961 and in 1978. The 1978 effort was kept alive over the next 20 years, and finally got to the ballot in November 2002. It passed with a record 77% of voters in support, a record that still stands today.

Geography and geology

Rancho Cordova is located at 38°35′6″N 121°17′50″W (38.585083, -121.297269). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 33.9 square miles (88 km2), of which, 33.5 square miles (87 km2) of it is land and 0.4 square miles (1.0 km2) of it (1.08%) is water.

Sacramento has a hot-summer Mediterranean climate (Köppen Csa), characterized by damp to wet, mild winters and moderately hot, dry summers. The wet season is generally October through April, though there may be a day or two of light rainfall in June or September. The normal annual mean temperature is 61.0 °F (16.1 °C), with the monthly daily average temperature ranging from 46.4 °F (8.0 °C) in December to 75.5 °F (24.2 °C) in July. Summer heat is often moderated by a sea breeze known as the “delta breeze” which comes through the Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta from the San Francisco Bay, and temperatures cool down sharply at night.

The American River is popular for kayaking and recreational boating.

The foggiest months are December and January. Tule fog can be extremely dense, lowering visibility to less than 100 feet (30 m) and making driving conditions extremely hazardous. Chilling tule fog events have been known to last for several consecutive days or weeks. During Tule fog events, temperatures do not exceed 50 degrees.

Snowfall is rare in Sacramento, which is only 25 ft (7.6 m) above sea level. In the downtown area, there have been only 3 significant snow accumulations since 1900, the last one being in 1976. During especially cold winter and spring storms, intense showers do occasionally produce a significant amount of hail, which can create hazardous driving conditions. Snowfall that does fall in the city often melts upon ground contact, with traceable amounts occurring in some years. Significant annual snow accumulations occur in the foothills located 40 miles (64 km) east of the city, which had brief and traceable amounts of snowfall in January 2002, December 2009 and February 2011. The greatest snowfall ever recorded in Sacramento was 3 inches (8 cm) on January 5, 1888.

farmer’s market at Chavez Park.

On average, there are 73 days where the high exceeds 90 °F (32 °C), and 14 days where the high exceeds 100 °F (38 °C); On the other extreme, there are 15 days where the temperature does not exceed 50 °F (10 °C), and 15 freezing nights per year. Official temperature extremes range from 18 °F (−8 °C) on December 22, 1990 to 115 °F (46 °C) on June 15, 1961; a station around 5 mi (8.0 km) east-southeast of the city dipped to 17 °F (−8 °C) on December 11, 1932.

The average annual precipitation is 18.52 inches (470 mm). On average, precipitation falls on 60 days each year in Sacramento, and nearly all of this falls during the winter months. Average January rainfall is 3.67 in (93 mm), and measurable precipitation is rare during the summer months. In February 1992, Sacramento had 16 consecutive days of rain, resulting in an accumulation of 6.41 in (163 mm) for the period. On rare occasions, monsoonal moisture surges from the Desert Southwest can bring upper-level moisture to the Sacramento region, leading to increased summer cloudiness, humidity, and even light showers and thunderstorms. Monsoon clouds do occur, usually during late July through early September. Sacramento is the second most flood susceptible city in the United States after New Orleans.

Sacramento has been noted as being the sunniest location on the planet for three months of the year, from July through September. It holds the distinction as the sunniest month, in terms of percent possible sunshine, of anywhere in the world; July in Sacramento averages 14 hours and 12 minutes of sunshine per day, amounting to approximately 98% of possible sunshine.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1960 7,429
1970 30,451 309.9%
1980 42,881 40.8%
1990 48,731 13.6%
2000 55,060 13.0%
2010 64,776 17.6%
Est. 2016 72,326 11.7%
U.S. Decennial Census

2010

The 2010 United States Census reported that Rancho Cordova had a population of 64,776. The population density was 1,912.3 people per square mile (738.3/km²). The racial makeup of Rancho Cordova was 39,123 (60.4%) White, 8,561 (13.1%) African American, 668 (1.0%) Native American, 7,831 (12.1%) Asian (3.6% Filipino, 2.0% Indian, 1.6% Vietnamese, 1.4% Chinese, 1.0% Korean, 0.4% Japanese, 2.0% Other), 556 (0.9%) Pacific Islander, 5,517 (8.5%) from other races, and 4,520 (7.0%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 12,740 persons (19.7%).

The Census reported that 64,451 people (99.5% of the population) lived in households, 170 (0.3%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 155 (0.2%) were institutionalized.

There were 23,448 households, out of which 8,722 (37.2%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 10,521 (44.9%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 3,815 (16.3%) had a female householder with no husband present, 1,431 (6.1%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 1,751 (7.5%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 198 (0.8%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 5,815 households (24.8%) were made up of individuals and 1,604 (6.8%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.75. There were 15,767 families (67.2% of all households); the average family size was 3.30.

The population was spread out with 17,011 people (26.3%) under the age of 18, 6,441 people (9.9%) aged 18 to 24, 19,508 people (30.1%) aged 25 to 44, 15,182 people (23.4%) aged 45 to 64, and 6,634 people (10.2%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33.1 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.3 males.

There were 25,479 housing units at an average density of 752.2 per square mile (290.4/km²), of which 12,948 (55.2%) were owner-occupied, and 10,500 (44.8%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 3.3%; the rental vacancy rate was 8.9%. 34,907 people (53.9% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 29,544 people (45.6%) lived in rental housing units.

2000

NOTE: The following demographic numbers were enumerated prior to incorporation.

As of the census of 2000, there were 55,060 people, 20,407 households, and 13,550 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 2,445.4 people per square mile (944.0/km²). There were 21,584 housing units at an average density of 958.6 per square mile (370.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 66.66% White, 11.34% African American, 0.95% Native American, 8.24% Asian, 0.54% Pacific Islander, 5.72% from other races, and 6.54% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 12.90% of the population.

There were 20,407 households out of which 34.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.1% were married couples living together, 16.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.6% were non-families. 25.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.68 and the average family size was 3.22.

The population was spread out with 28.4% under the age of 18, 10.2% from 18 to 24, 31.9% from 25 to 44, 19.4% from 45 to 64, and 10.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.1 males.

The median income for a household in the CDP was $40,095, and the median income for a family was $60,211. Males had a median income of $54,706 versus $45,383 for females.

1980

Following the adoption of the 1978 Cordova Community Plan, the Sacramento County Local Agency Formation Commission adopted a Sphere of Influence for Rancho Cordova. This is one of the defining documents of the actual community boundary for the community.

1980 Rancho Cordova Sphere of Influence Map

Government and politics

City government

The City of Rancho Cordova has a council-manager form of government with five members elected to the council, one of whom serves as mayor each year. The mayor’s post is thus simply that of “chief among equals for a time”. As of 2016, Rancho Cordova’s mayor is Donald Terry, and Linda Budge is vice mayor. All current City Council members have served as mayor during their terms on the council.

The City of Rancho Cordova has maintained nine straight years of balanced budgets. Its sound financial status has been recognized by the rating agency Standard and Poor. In July 2012 Standard and Poor’s (S&P) Rating Services reaffirmed the City of Rancho Cordova’s A+ long-term rating, noting the City’s outlook is stable and its financial performance has been good. As a credit-rating agency, S&P issues credit ratings for the debt of public and private corporations and has been designated a nationally recognized statistical rating organization by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. According to S&P, Rancho Cordova’s rating reflects the city’s “very strong wealth indicator, its good financial performance leading to a very strong fund balance, good financial management practices and policies, and its access to Eastern Sacramento metropolitan area.” “In our opinion, Rancho Cordova’s financial performance has been good with the City historically reporting consecutive surpluses,” said S&P’s analysis report. “The stable outlook reflects our view that City officials will likely continue to make the budgetary adjustments needed to maintain balanced operations, supported by at least what we consider strong available fund reserves.”[

County government

Rancho Cordova is represented by Don Nottoli on the Sacramento County Board of Supervisors.

State representation

In the California State Senate, Rancho Cordova is split between the 4th Senate District, represented by Republican Jim Nielsen, and the 8th Senate District, represented by Republican Andreas Borgeas. In the California State Assembly, it is in the 8th Assembly District, represented by Democrat Ken Cooley.

Federal representation

In the United States House of Representatives, Rancho Cordova is in California’s 7th congressional district, represented by Democrat Ami Bera.

Utilities

The city is served by three water agencies and one sewage treatment agency.

Electricity is provided by SMUD and natural gas is provided by Pacific Gas and Electric Company.

Public safety

Since incorporating in 2003, Rancho Cordova has maintained a law enforcement services contract with the Sacramento County Sheriff’s Department. While deputies assigned to Rancho Cordova wear unique “Rancho Cordova” uniform patches and drive police vehicles with “Rancho Cordova” markings, they are, in fact, sheriff’s deputies. The structure of the contracted Rancho Cordova Police Department closely mirrors that of an independent police department and includes detectives, traffic enforcement, community service officers, patrol, and administration functions. Per the contract, the City of Rancho Cordova pays the salaries for 55 sworn and 7 non-sworn staff.  This arrangement for contracted law enforcement services is fairly common among California cities because it requires fewer overhead costs than running an independent police department and allows the city to avoid long-term pension obligations for police employees.  Sacramento Metropolitan Fire District provides fire/EMS services.

The East Area Rapist, who was identified as Joseph James DeAngelo in April 2018 and arrested, was active in Rancho Cordova during the 1970s.

Economy and top employers

According to Rancho Cordova’s 2011 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, the top employers in the city are:

# Employer # of Employees
1 Health Net 2,000
2 Vision Service Plan 1,750
3 Delta Dental of California 1,000
4 Verizon 1,000
5 GenCorp (Aerojet) 1,000
6 Franklin Templeton Investments 900
7 Volcano Corp 700
8 Bank of America 600
9 Dignity Health 600
10 Sutter Health 500

Education

Rancho Cordova students are served by four school districts, with the majority of schools in the Folsom-Cordova Unified School District and has three high schools: Cordova High SchoolWalnutwood High School, and Kinney High School. Two elementary schools and one high school in the Sacramento Unified School District serve students in the western portion of Rancho Cordova, and students in the recently developed Anatolia area are served by Elk Grove Unified School District. A small number of students attend schools in the San Juan Unified School District.

Data on the educational status of Rancho Cordovans shows that approximately 85% of residents 25 years or older have a high school education and 22% of residents hold some type of college or post-secondary school degree. In Sacramento County, 85% of residents 25 years or older have a high school education and 28% of residents hold some type of college or post-secondary school degree. In California, 80% of residents 25 years or older have a high school education and 30% of residents hold some type of college or post-secondary school degree.

Sacramento is home to one major league sports team — the Sacramento Kings of the National Basketball Association. The Kings came to Sacramento from Kansas City in 1985. On January 21, 2013, a controlling interest of the Sacramento Kings was sold to Chris Hansen, who intended to move the franchise to Seattle for the 2013–2014 NBA season and rename the team the Seattle SuperSonics. Sacramento Mayor Kevin Johnson fought the move, forming an ownership group led by Vivek Ranadive to keep the Kings in Sacramento. On May 16, 2013, the NBA Board of Governors voted 22–8 to keep the Kings in Sacramento.

Sacramento has two other professional teams. Sacramento Republic FC began play in April 2014 at Hughes Stadium before a sellout crowd of 20,231, setting a USL Pro regular-season single game attendance record. They now play in Papa Murphy’s Park. The Republic FC won the USL championship in their first season. In 2000, AAA minor league baseball returned to Sacramento with the Sacramento River Cats, an affiliate of the San Francisco Giants and formerly an affiliate of the Oakland Athletics. The River Cats play in Raley Field, in West Sacramento.

Sacramento is the former home of two professional basketball teams. The Sacramento Heatwave of the American Basketball Association previously played in the Sacramento area until 2013. Sacramento was also formerly home to the now defunct Sacramento Monarchs of the WNBA. The Monarchs were one of the eight founding members of the WNBA in 1997 and won the WNBA Championship in 2005, but folded in November 2009.

Sacramento professional teams (ranked by attendance)
Club League Sport Venue Attendance Established Championships
Sacramento Kings NBA Basketball Golden 1 Center 16,291 1923 (1985) 1 NBA, 2 NBL (as Rochester Royals)
Sacramento Republic FC USLC (D2) Soccer Papa Murphy’s Park 13,763 2012 1 USL Pro
Sacramento River Cats PCL (AAA) Baseball Raley Field 8,435 1978 (2000) 2 Triple-A titles, 4 League titles

Sacramento has frequently hosted the NCAA Men’s Outdoor Track and Field Championship as well as the 1st and 2nd rounds of the NCAA Men’s Division I Basketball Championship. The California International Marathon (est. 1983) attracts a field of international elite runners who vie for a share of the $50,000 prize purse. The fast course is popular for runners seeking to achieve a Boston Marathon qualifying time and fitness runners.

Performing arts

There are several major theatre venues for Sacramento. The Sacramento Convention Center Complex governs both the Community Center Theatre and Memorial Auditorium. The Wells Fargo Pavilion is the most recent addition in 2003. It is built atop the old Music Circus tent foundations. Next to that is the McClatchy Main stage, originally built as a television studio, which was renovated at the same time the pavilion was built. It is the smaller of the venues and provides seating for only 300. The Sacramento BalletSacramento Philharmonic Orchestra and the Sacramento Opera perform at the Community Center Theater.

Professional theatre is represented in Sacramento by a number of companies. Broadway Sacramento and its Summer stock theatreBroadway At Music Circus, lure many directors, performers, and artists from New York and Los Angeles to work alongside a large local staff for their productions at the Wells Fargo Pavilion. During the fall, winter and spring seasons Broadway Sacramento brings bus and truck tours to the Community Center Theater. At the B Street Theatre, smaller and more intimate professional productions are performed as well as a children’s theatre. In February 2018, the theatre moved from its original location and opened a larger theatre complex in the heart of Midtown. Rounding out the professional companies is Capital Stage, which performed aboard the Delta King until the end of the 2010–2011 season and soon took up residence at its own venue along the J-Street corridor.

The Sacramento area has one of the largest collection of community theatres in California. Some of these include the Thistle Dew Dessert Theatre and Playwrights Workshop, Davis Musical Theatre Co., El Dorado Musical Theatre, Runaway Stage Productions, River City Theatre Company, Flying Monkey Productions, The Actor’s Theatre, KOLT Run Productions, Kookaburra Productions, Big Idea Theatre, Celebration Arts, Lambda Player, Light Opera Theatre of Sacramento, Synergy Stage and the historic Eagle Theatre. The Sacramento Shakespeare Festival provides entertainment under the stars every summer in William Land Park. Many of these theatres compete annually for the Elly Awards overseen by The Sacramento Area Regional Theatre Alliance or SARTA.

Visual arts

The Sacramento Metropolitan Arts Commission is an organization which was established as the Sacramento arts council in 1977 to provide several arts programs for the city. These include Art in Public Places, Arts Education, Grants and Cultural Programs, Poet Laureate Program, Arts Stabilization Programs and Other Resources and opportunities.

Sacramento Second Saturday Art Walk is a program of local art galleries that stay open into the late evenings every second Saturday of each month, providing a unique experience for the local population as well as tourists to view original art and meet the artists themselves.

Museums

The Crocker Art Museum is the oldest public art museum in the Western United States and has one of the premier public art collections in the country.

Sacramento has several major museums. The Crocker Art Museum is the oldest public art museum west of the Mississippi River. On July 26, 2007, the museum broke ground for an expansion that more than tripled the museum’s floor space. The modern architecture is very different from the museum’s original Victorian style building. Construction was completed in 2010.

Also of interest is the Governor’s Mansion State Historic Park, a large Victorian Mansion which was home to 13 of California’s Governors, as well as the official residence for current governor Jerry Brown following renovations in 2015. The Leland Stanford Mansion State Historic Park, which was completely restored in 2006, serves as the State’s official address for diplomatic and business receptions. Guided public tours are available. The California Museum for History, Women, and the Arts, home of the California Hall of Fame, is a cultural destination dedicated to telling the rich history of California and its unique influence on the world of ideas, innovation, art and culture. The museum educates tens of thousands of school children through inspiring programs, sharing with world visitors California’s rich art, history and cultural legacy through dynamic exhibits, and serving as a public forum and international meeting place.

The California State Railroad Museum in Old Sacramento has historical exhibits and live steam locomotives that patrons may ride. The California Automobile Museum, located just south of Old Sacramento, is filled with automotive history and vehicles from 1880 to 2006 and is the oldest non-profit automotive museum in the West. The mission of it is to preserve, promote, and teach automotive culture and its influence on our lives—past, present and future. In addition, the Sacramento History Museum, in the heart of Old Sacramento, focuses on the history of Sacramento from the region’s pre-Gold Rush history through the present day.

There is a Museum Day held in Sacramento every year, when 26 museums in the greater Sacramento area offer free admission. The 2009 Sacramento Museum Day brought out more than 80,000 people, the largest number the event has gathered. Sacramento Museum Day is held every year on the first Saturday of February.

Music

Tower Records was started and based in Sacramento until its closing Rappers C-BoMarvalessLunasicc, and more recently rappers like Mozzy and Chuuwee are among those native to the area. Classical music is widely available. The Sacramento Philharmonic Orchestra, the Sacramento Baroque Soloists, the Sacramento Choral Society & Orchestra, the Sacramento Youth Symphony, the Sacramento Master Singers, the Sacramento Children’s Chorus, and the Camellia Symphony each present a full season of concerts.

Each year, the city hosts the Sammies, the Sacramento Music Awards. Sacramento also has a reputation as a center for Dixieland jazz, because of the Sacramento Jazz Jubilee which is held every Memorial Day weekend. Events and performances are held in multiple locations throughout the city. Each year thousands of jazz fans from all over the world visit for this one weekend.

A growing number of rock, hardcore and metal bands hail from the Sacramento area, including TeslaDeftonesPapa RoachWill HavenTrash Talk, Dance Gavin DanceA Lot Like BirdsFarCAKE!!!Oleander and Steel Breeze; plus some other famous musicians like record producer and recording artist Charlie PeacockBob Stubbs of Social Distortion and Craig Chaquico of Jefferson Starship. Along with these bands, the Aftershock Festival has been held at Discovery Park since 2012.

Scottish pop band Middle of the Road sang kindly of Sacramento in their 1972 European hit song “Sacramento”. Experimental groups such as HellaDeath Grips, and Tera Melos also come out of Sacramento.

Film

Sacramento is home to the Sacramento French Film Festival, a cultural event held every year in July that features U.S. premieres of French films and classic masterpieces of French cinema and the Sacramento Japanese Film Festival, also held in July. In addition, Sacramento is home to the Trash Film Orgy, a summer film festival celebrating the absurd, B-movies, horror, monster, exploitation. Founded in 2007, the Sacramento Horror Film Festival showcases feature-length and short films as well as live musical and theatrical performances in the horror and macabre genres.

Of note, Sacramento has been home to various actors, including Eddie Murphy, who resided in the Riverlake community of Pocket-Greenhaven with his then wife Nicole Mitchell Murphy, a fashion model and Sacramento native. It is also the home of director Greta Gerwig, whose solo directorial debut Lady Bird is set in Sacramento.

Cuisine

The Sacramento Theatre Companyis Sacramento’s oldest theatre troupe

In 2012, Sacramento started the marketing campaign as “America’s Farm-to-Fork Capital” due to Sacramento’s many restaurants that source their food locally from the numerous surrounding farms. The city has an annual Farm-to-Fork festival that showcases various grocers and growers in the industry. In 2012, The Kitchen was nominated for Outstanding Restaurant by the James Beard Foundation. It continues to excel, earning the AAA‘s Five Diamond dining award since 2011. Sacramento is home to well-known cookbook authors, Biba Caggiano of Biba’s Restaurant and Mai Pham of Lemongrass and Star Ginger.

Sacramento is also known for its beverage culture, with keystone events that include Cal Expo‘s Grape and Gourmet, Sacramento Beer Week, and Sacramento Cocktail Week. Its growing beer scene is evident, with over 60 microbreweries in the region as of 2017. Some local brews include Track 7 Brewing Company, Big Stump Brew Co, Oak Park Brewing Co., and Sactown Union Brewery. Numerous beer festivals around the region highlight both local and visitor beers. In addition to festivals in Elk Grove, Davis, Roseville, Placerville, and Woodland, Sacramento hosts the annual California Beer Craft Summit, an exposition dedicated to the art of brewing. The summit also hosts the largest beer festival on the West Coast, featuring over 160 breweries in downtown Sacramento.

Sacramento’s contemporary culture is reflected in its coffee. An “underrated coffee city”, Sacramento has above-average marks for local coffee. The city has numerous community roasters and coffee shops. Examples include Temple Coffee, Insight Coffee Roasters, Old Soul Co., Chocolate Fish Roasters, Naked Lounge, Pachamama Roasting Co., and Identity Coffees. In addition to local brands, the region offers other chains like Starbucks, Peet’s Coffee & Tea, and Philz Coffee.

LGBTQ

Sacramento has one of the highest LGBT populations per capita, ranking seventh among major American cities, and third in California behind San Francisco and slightly behind Oakland, with roughly 10% of the city’s total population identifying themselves as gay, lesbian, transgender, or bisexual. Lavender Heights is the hub for LGBTQ activities in the city and is a centrally located district in Midtown Sacramento centered within and around K & 20th streets. The area owes its name to the high number of gay-owned homes and businesses residing there. The area is also home to many of the city’s LGBTQ inclusive music and arts festivals, including the Second Saturday Block Party from May to September.

Old Sacramento

The oldest part of the town besides Sutter’s Fort is Old Sacramento, which consists of cobbled streets and many historic buildings, several from the 1850s and 1860s. Buildings have been preserved, restored or reconstructed, and the district is now a substantial tourist attraction, with rides on steam-hauled historic trains and horse-drawn carriages.

The historic buildings include the Lady Adams Building, built by the passengers and ship’s carpenters of the ship Lady Adams. Having survived the Great Conflagration of November 1852, it is the oldest surviving building in Sacramento other than Sutter’s Fort.

Another surviving landmark is the B.F. Hastings building, built in 1853. Early home of the California Supreme Court and the location of the office of Theodore Judah, it also was the western terminus of the Pony Express.

The “Big Four Building”, built in 1852, was home to the offices of Collis HuntingtonMark HopkinsLeland Stanford, and Charles Crocker. The Central Pacific Railroad and Southern Pacific Railroad were founded there. The original building was destroyed in 1963 for the construction of Interstate 5, but was re-created using original elements in 1965. It is now a National Historic Landmark. Also of historic interest is the Eagle Theatre (Sacramento, California), a reconstruction of California’s first permanent theatre in its original location.

Chinatown

Historic Sacramento Chinatown Paifang.

The Opium Wars of the 1840s and 1850s, along with the Gold Rush, brought many Chinese to California. Most arrived at San Francisco, which was then the largest city in California and known as “Dai Fow” (“Big City”, Chinese: 大埠, Jyutpingdaai6 fau6). Some eventually came to Sacramento, then the second-largest city in California and consequently called “Yee Fow” (“Second City”, Chinese: 二埠, Jyutping: ji6 fau6). Today the city is known as 萨克拉门托 (pinyinSàkèlāméntuō) by Mainland Chinese and as 沙加緬度 (pinyin: Shājiāmiǎnduó) by Taiwanese.

Sacramento’s Chinatown was located on “I” Street from Second to Sixth Streets. At the time, this area of “I” Street was considered a health hazard because, lying within a levee zone, it was lower than other parts of the city, which were situated on higher land. Throughout Sacramento’s Chinatown history, there were fires, acts of discrimination, and prejudicial legislation such as the Chinese Exclusion Act that was not repealed until 1943. The mysterious fires were thought to be set off by those who did not take a liking to the Chinese working class. Ordinances on what was viable building material were set into place to try to get the Chinese to move out. Newspapers such as The Sacramento Union wrote stories at the time that portrayed the Chinese in an unfavorable light to inspire ethnic discrimination and drive the Chinese away. As the years passed, a railroad was created over parts of the Chinatown, and further policies and laws would make it even harder for Chinese workers to sustain a living in Sacramento.

While most of Sacramento’s Chinatown has now been razed, a small Chinatown mall remains as well as a museum dedicated to the history of Sacramento’s Chinatown and the contributions Chinese Americans have made to the city. Amtrak sits along what was part of Sacramento’s Chinatown “I” Street.

Notable people[edit]

This is a list of notable people from Rancho Cordova.

Magazines

Newspapers

Top two newspapers
  • The Sacramento Bee, the primary newspaper, was founded in 1857 by James McClatchyThe Sacramento Bee is the flagship paper of The McClatchy Company, the second-largest newspaper publisher in the United States. The Sacramento Bee has won five Pulitzer Prizes in its history and numerous other awards, including many for its progressive public service campaigns promoting free speech (the Bee often criticized government policy, and uncovered many scandals hurting Californians), anti-racism (the Bee supported the Union during the American Civil War and later publicly denounced the Ku Klux Klan), worker’s rights (the Bee has a strong history of supporting unionization), and environmental protection (leading numerous tree-planting campaigns and fighting against environmental destruction in the Sierra Nevada).
  • The Sacramento Union, the Sacramento Bees rival, started publishing six years earlier in 1851; it closed its doors in 1994, with a revival attempt lasting from 2005 to 2009. Writer and journalist Mark Twain wrote for the Union in 1866.
Other newspapers

Radio

Television stations

Channel Call Sign Network Subchannels
3 KCRA-TV NBC MeTV on 3.2
6 KVIE PBS PBS Encore on 6.2, World on 6.3, PBS Kids on 6.4
8 KBTV-CD Independent Ethnic Infomercials on 8.2, SBN on 8.3, Independent on 8.4, Retro Television Network on 8.5, HOT TV on 8.6, Rev’n on 8.7
10 KXTV ABC Justice Network on 10.2, Heroes & Icons on 10.3
13 KOVR CBS Decades on 13.2
19 KUVS-DT Univision Bounce TV on 19.3, Escape on 19.4
27 K20JX-D 3ABN
29 KSPX-TV Ion Qubo on 29.2, Ion Life on 29.3, Ion Shop on 29.4, QVC on 29.5, HSN on 29.6
31 KMAX-TV CW
32 KSTV-LP Azteca
33 KCSO-LD Telemundo
40 KTXL Fox Antenna TV on 40.2, This TV on 40.3
58 KQCA MyNetworkTV Movies! on 58.2
64 KTFK Telefutura

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