Rocklin California Real Estate and Community Information

Rocklin California Real Estate and Community Information

All About Rocklin California

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Rocklin is a city in Placer County, California located approximately 22 miles (35 km) from Sacramento, California, and about 6.1 miles (9.8 km) northeast of Roseville in the Sacramento metropolitan area. Besides Roseville, it shares borders with Granite BayLoomis and Lincoln. As of the 2010 census, Rocklin’s population was 56,974.

History

Prior to the California Gold Rush the Nisenan Maidu occupied both permanent villages and temporary summer shelters along the rivers and streams which miners sifted, sluiced, dredged and dammed to remove the gold.Explorer Jedediah Smith and a large party of American fur trappers crossed the Sacramento Valley in late April, 1827. The group saw many Maidu villages along the river banks. Deprived of traditional foodstuffs, homesites and hunting grounds by the emigrants, the Nisenan were among the earliest California Indian tribes to disappear.

During the 1850s, miners sluiced streams and rivers including Secret Ravine which runs through Rocklin. The piles of dredger tailings is still obvious today, between Roseville and Loomis southeast of Interstate 80. Secret Ravine at the area now at the intersection of Ruhkala Road and Pacific Street was later mined for granite, some of which was used as the base course of the California Capitol Building in Sacramento, although the earliest recorded use of the rock was for Fort Mason at San Francisco in 1855.The granite was hauled out by ox carts before the arrival of the railroad many years later.

In 1860, the U.S. Census counted 440 residents in the area of Secret Ravine, of which approximately 16% had been born in Ireland and the majority of whom worked as miners.The area was referred to as Secret Ravine or the “granite quarries at the end of the tracks” as late as 1864.

Rocklin’s history is closely tied to the transcontinental railroad. In 1862, the Pacific Railroad Act granted the Central Pacific Railroad land near Secret Ravine. In 1864, the Central Pacific Railroad completed an extension of its track southwest from Newcastle to Secret Ravine. It named the area Rocklin after its granite quarry, and used the site as a refueling and water stop. The Central Pacific built a roundhouse in 1867. The transcontinental railroad was completed in 1869, significantly increasing railroad traffic through the town. According to the 1870 census, Rocklin had grown to 542 residents, and the majority of Irish immigrants had foregone mining and were working for the railroad.In 1906 the Central Pacific moved its facility from Rocklin to Roseville, where more land was available for expansion. The site in Roseville has remained in continuous use since. As of August 2014, it is the largest rail facility near the US West Coast.

In 1869 a group of laid-off Chinese railroad workers moved to Secret Ravine to mine and raise vegetables which they sold locally. They were driven out during the anti-Chinese pogrom of September 1876, but the area is still known as China Gardens.

The Rocklin post office opened in 1868. Finnish immigrants settled in Rocklin starting in the 1870s, and Spanish settlers arriving by way of Hawaii settled in Rocklin during the early 20th Century. The town incorporatedin 1893.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 19.6 square miles (51 km2), of which 0.05 square miles (0.13 km2), or 0.27%, is water.

Climate

Rocklin has a hot-summer Mediterranean climate (Köppen Csa) that is characterized by cool, wet winters and hot, dry summers. Summer months are hot, with an average July high of 94 °F (34 °C) and rainless for the most part. Winter months, on the other hand, are cool with a December average of 47 °F (8 °C) and give way to plenty of rain. Rocklin very rarely sees any snow accumulation. The degree of diurnal temperature variation varies greatly depending on time of year. It ranges from only 14°F in January to 33°F in July.

hideClimate data for Rocklin, California
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 75
(24)
78
(26)
86
(30)
98
(37)
107
(42)
110
(43)
115
(46)
110
(43)
111
(44)
102
(39)
87
(31)
76
(24)
115
(46)
Average high °F (°C) 53
(12)
60
(16)
64
(18)
71
(22)
80
(27)
88
(31)
94
(34)
92
(33)
87
(31)
77
(25)
63
(17)
54
(12)
74
(23)
Daily mean °F (°C) 46
(8)
51
(11)
54
(12)
60
(16)
66
(19)
73
(23)
78
(26)
76
(24)
73
(23)
65
(18)
54
(12)
47
(8)
62
(17)
Average low °F (°C) 39
(4)
42
(6)
44
(7)
48
(9)
53
(12)
58
(14)
61
(16)
61
(16)
58
(14)
52
(11)
44
(7)
39
(4)
50
(10)
Record low °F (°C) 21
(−6)
23
(−5)
27
(−3)
33
(1)
36
(2)
43
(6)
48
(9)
46
(8)
41
(5)
31
(−1)
27
(−3)
16
(−9)
16
(−9)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 3.98
(101)
3.46
(88)
3.07
(78)
1.58
(40)
0.58
(15)
0.12
(3.0)
0.04
(1.0)
0.06
(1.5)
0.35
(8.9)
1.08
(27)
2.80
(71)
3.33
(85)
20.45
(519.4)
Average snowfall inches (cm) 0.2
(0.51)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0.2
(0.51)
Source: http://www.myforecast.com/bin/climate.m?city=12122&metric=false

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1870 542
1880 624 15.1%
1890 1,056 69.2%
1900 1,050 −0.6%
1910 1,026 −2.3%
1920 643 −37.3%
1930 724 12.6%
1940 795 9.8%
1950 1,155 45.3%
1960 1,495 29.4%
1970 3,039 103.3%
1980 7,344 141.7%
1990 19,033 159.2%
2000 36,330 90.9%
2010 56,974 56.8%
Est. 2016 62,787 10.2%
U.S. Decennial Census

2010

The 2010 United States Census reported that Rocklin had a population of 56,974. The population density was 2,907.7 people per square mile (1,122.7/km²). The racial makeup of Rocklin was 47,047 (82.6%) White, 858 (1.5%) African American, 410 (0.7%) Native American, 4,105 (7.2%) Asian, 150 (0.3%) Pacific Islander, 1,538 (2.7%) from other races, and 2,866 (5.0%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6,555 persons (11.5%).

The Census reported that 56,337 people (98.9% of the population) lived in households, 456 (0.8%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 181 (0.3%) were institutionalized.

There were 20,800 households, out of which 8,424 (40.5%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 11,974 (57.6%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 2,191 (10.5%) had a female householder with no husband present, 895 (4.3%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 1,035 (5.0%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 124 (0.6%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 4,403 households (21.2%) were made up of individuals and 1,652 (7.9%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.71. There were 15,060 families (72.4% of all households); the average family size was 3.18.

The population was spread out with 15,613 people (27.4%) under the age of 18, 5,306 people (9.3%) aged 18 to 24, 15,159 people (26.6%) aged 25 to 44, 14,668 people (25.7%) aged 45 to 64, and 6,228 people (10.9%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36.7 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.4 males.

There were 22,010 housing units at an average density of 1,123.3 per square mile (433.7/km²), of which 13,797 (66.3%) were owner-occupied, and 7,003 (33.7%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 2.5%; the rental vacancy rate was 7.3%. 39,295 people (69.0% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 17,042 people (29.9%) lived in rental housing units.

2000

As of the census of 2000, there were 36,330 people, 13,258 households, and 10,009 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,246.2 people per square mile (867.5/km²). There were 14,421 housing units at an average density of 891.6 per square mile (344.3/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 88.32% White, 0.91% African American, 0.80% Native American, 4.16% Asian, 0.19% Pacific Islander, 1.93% from other races, and 3.69% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.91% of the population. 16.8% were of German, 11.8% English, 10.6% Irish, 8.1% Italian and 6.5% American ancestry according to Census 2000.

There were 13,258 households out of which 42.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.3% were married couples living together, 9.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.5% were non-families. 18.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.74 and the average family size was 3.15.

In the city, the population was spread out with 30.0% under the age of 18, 7.0% from 18 to 24, 33.7% from 25 to 44, 20.8% from 45 to 64, and 8.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.6 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $79,274, according to the City of Rocklin website. Males had a median income of $54,426 versus $35,920 for females. The per capita income for the city was $26,910. About 3.1% of families and 4.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.3% of those under age 18 and 3.5% of those age 65 or over.

Economy

Granite mining ended in 2004 in Rocklin. Now, top Rocklin employers include large multinational corporations, retail outlets, education and government. As of April 2016, Rocklin had an estimated civilian work force of 30,100 with an unemployment rate of 4.4%. Approximately 40% of Rocklin citizens over age 25 hold a bachelor’s degree or higher.

Shopping, entertainment and dining can be found in the Blue Oaks Town Center, a regional shopping center anchored by national tenants, located on the Highway 65 corridor, as well as Rocklin Commons and Rocklin Crossings along Interstate 80. There is a section of Granite Drive along Interstate 80 known as Toy Row, with high-end auto dealerships, RV and Boat retailers, and there is also a local antique mall. Rocklin Hacker Lab is a collaboration between Hacker Lab and Sierra College. It is an incubator, co-working, hacker and maker space with classes and meetups daily.

The city has four districts with distinct architectural guidelines: The University District, Granite District, College District, Quarry District. Each District will ultimately create a unique environmental atmosphere and character, defined geographically based on land use, transportation, and natural features.

The Government of Sacramento operates as a charter city (as opposed to a general law city) under the Charter of the City of Sacramento. The elected government is composed of the Sacramento City Council with 8 city council districts and the Mayor of Sacramento, which operate under a mayor-council government.

In addition, there are numerous departments and appointed officers such as the City Manager, Sacramento Police Department (SPD), the Sacramento Fire Department (SFD), City Clerk, City Attorney, and City Treasurer.

As of 2016, the mayor is Darrell Steinberg and the council members are Angelique Ashby, Allen Warren, Jeff Harris, Steve Hansen, Jay Schenirer, Rich Jennings, and Larry Carr.

The City of Sacramento is part of Sacramento County, for which the government of Sacramento County is defined and authorized under the California ConstitutionCalifornia law, and the Charter of the County of Sacramento.

As the capital city of California, Sacramento is home to the Government of California, as the seat of the Governor of California, the California Assembly, and one of the three homes of the California Supreme Court, as well as the numerous California state agencies.

State and Federal representation

In the California State Senate, Sacramento is the heart of the 6th district, represented by Democrat Richard Pan. In the California State Assembly, it is split between the 7th Assembly District, represented by Democrat Kevin McCarty, and the 9th Assembly District, represented by Democrat Jim Cooper.

In the United States House of Representatives, Sacramento forms the majority of the California’s 6th congressional district, represented by Democrat Doris Matsui.

Infrastructure

Transportation

Interstate 80 and State Route 65 intersect in Rocklin, and historic U.S. Route 40 runs through town. The Rocklin (Amtrak station) is served by the Capitol Corridor and the California Zephyr routes.

Education

The Rocklin area is home to eleven elementary schools, two middle schools, two high schools, two alternative education institutions as well as campuses of Sierra Collegeand William Jessup University.

Higher education

The main campuses of the University of California, Davis are in Davis, California (top) and Central Sacramento (bottom).

Sacramento State University is one of the best ranked universities on the West Coast.

The Sacramento area hosts a wide variety of higher educational opportunities. There are two major public universities, many private institutions, community colleges, vocational schools, and McGeorge School of Law.

Sacramento is home to Sacramento State (California State University, Sacramento), founded as Sacramento State College in 1947. In 2004, enrollment was 22,555 undergraduates and 5,417 graduate students in the university’s eight colleges. The university’s mascot is the hornet, and the school colors are green and gold. The 300 acres (1.2 km2) campus is located along the American River Parkway a few miles east of downtown.

The University of California has a campus, UC Davis, in nearby Davis and has a graduate center in downtown Sacramento. The UC Davis Graduate School of Management (GSM) is near the UC Davis Medical Center off of Stockton Boulevard near Highway 50. Many students, about 400 out of 517, at the UC Davis GSM are working professionals and are completing their MBA part-time. The part-time program is ranked in the top-20 and is well known for its small class size, world class faculty, and involvement in the business community. UC also maintains the University of California Sacramento Center (UCCS) for undergraduate and graduate studies. Similar to the UC’s Washington, D.C., program, “Scholar Interns” engage in both academic studies and as well as internships, often with the state government. The UC Davis School of Medicine is located at the UC Davis Medical Center between the neighborhoods of ElmhurstTahoe Park, and Oak Park.

The Los Rios Community College District consists of several two-year colleges in the Sacramento area—American River CollegeCosumnes River CollegeSacramento City CollegeFolsom Lake College, plus a large number of outreach centers for those colleges. Sierra College is on the outskirts of Sacramento in Rocklin.

University of the Pacific has its Sacramento Campus in the Oak Park neighborhood of Sacramento. The campus has long included McGeorge School of Law and in 2015 was expanded to become a comprehensive graduate and professional campus, including programs in analytics, business, education, health sciences, and public policy.

The National University Sacramento regional campus offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in business, education, health-care and teaching credential programs.

The University of San Francisco has one of its four regional campuses in Sacramento. At the undergraduate level they offer degrees in Applied Economics, Information Systems, Organizational Behavior and Leadership, and Public Administration. At the graduate level, Master’s programs are offered in: Information Security and Assurance, Information Systems, Organization Development, Project Management, Public Administration, Nonprofit Administration, and Counseling.

The private University of Southern California has an extension in downtown Sacramento, called the State Capital Center. The campus, taught by main campus professors, Sacramento-based professors, and practitioners in the State Capitol and state agencies, offers Master of Public Administration, Masters of Public Policy, and Master of Public Health degrees.

Epic Bible College and the Professional School of Psychology are also based in Sacramento. Western Seminary has one of its four campuses in Sacramento, which opened on the campus of Arcade Church in 1991. Western is an evangelical, Christian graduate school that provides theological training for students who hope to serve in a variety of ministry roles including pastors, marriage and family therapists, educators, missionaries and lay leadership. The Sacramento campus offers four master’s degrees, and a variety of other graduate-level programs.

A satellite campus of Alliant International University offers graduate and undergraduate programs of study.

The Art Institute of California – Sacramento was established in 2007, and is a branch of The Art Institute of California – Los Angeles. The school is focused on educating students in the field of commercial arts. The school offers both a Bachelor of Science and an Associate of Science degree, as well as diplomas in some areas of study. Some majors the school offers are Digital Film-making & Video Production, Culinary Management, Graphic Design, and Game Art & Design.

On J Street, there is the Lincoln Law School of Sacramento, a private, evening-only law school program with a strong legal presence in the region.

The Universal Technical Institute (UTI) is in Sacramento; it offers automotive programs in auto mechanical, auto body, and diesel.

Primary & secondary education

The historic C.K. McClatchy High School.

The Sacramento Public Library system has 28 branches located in the greater area. The Sacramento area is served by various public school districts, including the Sacramento City Unified School DistrictNatomas Unified School DistrictSan Juan Unified School DistrictTwin Rivers Unified School District, and Elk Grove Unified School District. As of 2009, the area’s schools employed 9,600 elementary school teachers (not including special education teachers), and 7,410 middle school teachers (not including special education or vocational teachers).

Almost all areas south of the American River are served by the Sacramento City Unified School District. The only exceptions are the Valley Hi/North Laguna and Florin areas that are served by the Elk Grove Unified School District.

Areas north of the American River are served by the remaining school districts. This area was not originally part of the City of Sacramento and as such is not served by Sacramento City Unified School District. North Sacramento outside of Natomas and Robla (for K-8) is served by the Twin Rivers Unified School District. The Robla area is served by the Robla School District for K-8 and by Twin Rivers for 9–12. The Natomas region is served by the Natomas Unified School District. The Campus Commons area and the small portions of the Sierra Oaks neighborhood that fall into the city of Sacramento are served by the San Juan Unified School District.

While Roman Catholic institutions still dominate the independent school scene in the Sacramento area, in 1964, Sacramento Country Day School opened and offered Sacramento citizens an independent school that is affiliated with the California Association of Independent Schools. SCDS has grown to its present-day status as a learning community for students from pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade. Additionally, the suburb of Fair Oaks hosts the expansive riverside campus of the Sacramento Waldorf School, a Steiner school adjacent to the Rudolf Steiner College, and the largest Waldorf school in North America. Sacramento Waldorf School educates students from pre-K through 12th grade on a secluded, pastoral site that incorporates a large, functioning biodynamic farm.

Shalom School is the only Jewish day school in Sacramento; however, Brookefield School on property owned by Congregation B’nai Israel provides extracurricular Jewish education.

Capital Christian School is a pre-school–12th grade private, Christian school. There is a small Bible college on campus offering associate degrees in Bible studies or theology. Sacramento Adventist Academy is another Christian school in Greater Sacramento. This is a pre-school–12 institution, as well.

There is one Islamic school in Sacramento, Masjid Annur, founded in 1988.

Notable people

Sacramento is home to one major league sports team — the Sacramento Kings of the National Basketball Association. The Kings came to Sacramento from Kansas City in 1985. On January 21, 2013, a controlling interest of the Sacramento Kings was sold to Chris Hansen, who intended to move the franchise to Seattle for the 2013–2014 NBA season and rename the team the Seattle SuperSonics. Sacramento Mayor Kevin Johnson fought the move, forming an ownership group led by Vivek Ranadive to keep the Kings in Sacramento. On May 16, 2013, the NBA Board of Governors voted 22–8 to keep the Kings in Sacramento.

Sacramento has two other professional teams. Sacramento Republic FC began play in April 2014 at Hughes Stadium before a sellout crowd of 20,231, setting a USL Pro regular-season single game attendance record. They now play in Papa Murphy’s Park. The Republic FC won the USL championship in their first season. In 2000, AAA minor league baseball returned to Sacramento with the Sacramento River Cats, an affiliate of the San Francisco Giants and formerly an affiliate of the Oakland Athletics. The River Cats play in Raley Field, in West Sacramento.

Sacramento is the former home of two professional basketball teams. The Sacramento Heatwave of the American Basketball Association previously played in the Sacramento area until 2013. Sacramento was also formerly home to the now defunct Sacramento Monarchs of the WNBA. The Monarchs were one of the eight founding members of the WNBA in 1997 and won the WNBA Championship in 2005, but folded in November 2009.

Sacramento professional teams (ranked by attendance)
Club League Sport Venue Attendance Established Championships
Sacramento Kings NBA Basketball Golden 1 Center 16,291 1923 (1985) 1 NBA, 2 NBL (as Rochester Royals)
Sacramento Republic FC USLC (D2) Soccer Papa Murphy’s Park 13,763 2012 1 USL Pro
Sacramento River Cats PCL (AAA) Baseball Raley Field 8,435 1978 (2000) 2 Triple-A titles, 4 League titles

Sacramento has frequently hosted the NCAA Men’s Outdoor Track and Field Championship as well as the 1st and 2nd rounds of the NCAA Men’s Division I Basketball Championship. The California International Marathon (est. 1983) attracts a field of international elite runners who vie for a share of the $50,000 prize purse. The fast course is popular for runners seeking to achieve a Boston Marathon qualifying time and fitness runners.

Magazines

Newspapers

Top two newspapers
  • The Sacramento Bee, the primary newspaper, was founded in 1857 by James McClatchyThe Sacramento Bee is the flagship paper of The McClatchy Company, the second-largest newspaper publisher in the United States. The Sacramento Bee has won five Pulitzer Prizes in its history and numerous other awards, including many for its progressive public service campaigns promoting free speech (the Bee often criticized government policy, and uncovered many scandals hurting Californians), anti-racism (the Bee supported the Union during the American Civil War and later publicly denounced the Ku Klux Klan), worker’s rights (the Bee has a strong history of supporting unionization), and environmental protection (leading numerous tree-planting campaigns and fighting against environmental destruction in the Sierra Nevada).
  • The Sacramento Union, the Sacramento Bees rival, started publishing six years earlier in 1851; it closed its doors in 1994, with a revival attempt lasting from 2005 to 2009. Writer and journalist Mark Twain wrote for the Union in 1866.
Other newspapers

Radio

Television stations

Channel Call Sign Network Subchannels
3 KCRA-TV NBC MeTV on 3.2
6 KVIE PBS PBS Encore on 6.2, World on 6.3, PBS Kids on 6.4
8 KBTV-CD Independent Ethnic Infomercials on 8.2, SBN on 8.3, Independent on 8.4, Retro Television Network on 8.5, HOT TV on 8.6, Rev’n on 8.7
10 KXTV ABC Justice Network on 10.2, Heroes & Icons on 10.3
13 KOVR CBS Decades on 13.2
19 KUVS-DT Univision Bounce TV on 19.3, Escape on 19.4
27 K20JX-D 3ABN
29 KSPX-TV Ion Qubo on 29.2, Ion Life on 29.3, Ion Shop on 29.4, QVC on 29.5, HSN on 29.6
31 KMAX-TV CW
32 KSTV-LP Azteca
33 KCSO-LD Telemundo
40 KTXL Fox Antenna TV on 40.2, This TV on 40.3
58 KQCA MyNetworkTV Movies! on 58.2
64 KTFK Telefutura

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